WELCOME to the June 2020 CHRODIS PLUS Internal Newsletter

Update from CHRODIS PLUS

The past few months have certainly been tumultuous as the COVID19 pandemic swept the globe. Here at CHRODIS PLUS we truly hope you and your loved ones have stayed safe during these uncertain times. Throughout it all, we have continued working on the wonderful project that is CHRODIS PLUS, which is now nearing its end. In this newsletter, you will find out when to save the date for the JA’s final conference and what to expect from the project once it does come to a close. 

Additionally, we’ve conducted a final interview with Andrew Barnfield, a key expert of WP5 who has left the project. You can also find out if a doctor should trust your life with AI, what our project team from Spain published about the Application of the JA-CHRODIS Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model (IMCM) to a Case Study of Diabetes and Mental Health and, last but not least, don’t forget to follow CHRODIS PLUS on social media for the latest info on Joint Action events as well as work that is being done or is being finalised:

Your Chrodis Plus communication team:

Zuzana Matlonova

Zoltan Aszalos

Eva Csecsodi

Maria Stambler

Coronavirus and the final conference of the CHRODIS PLUS project

Our CHRODIS PLUS project is coming to an end by November this year – 2020. This has been a fantastic project with a very difficult ending: the COVID19 pandemic has and is still changing and altering the way we are conducting our numerous project activities, including workshops and various meetings. Despite this crisis, there is a lot the project partners can and should share before the project does come to an end. Therefore, we’ve planned a General Assembly for the project partners preceded by a closing conference to demonstrate and discuss what this project has achieved throughout its 39-month lifetime. 

To do this, the CHRODIS PLUS Closing Conference and General Assembly will be held online on 27 and 28 of October, 2020, respectively. So please save the date and we will keep you informed about the developments on our website as well as on our social media platforms!

What happens after CHRODIS PLUS ends? 

Is there life after CHRODIS PLUS? Of course! The project’s results will continue to live on and inform policy makers and the public about best practices in the area of chronic diseases in the virtual domain. 

WP2 shares details of the sustainability plan

CHRODIS PLUS is in its final year and we are actively working on developing a strategy that supports the ongoing dissemination of the results after the project’s termination in November, 2020.

We set this as a priority because we think that a strong sustainability strategy should lie at the core of every joint action. We will do our best to ensure that the project and everything you have achieved in the past 3 years lives on by addressing these achievements in the right forms and to the right audience. 

How are we going to do this? First of all, based on the communication channels data and the experience gained so far, we have identified the top 4 communication tools that will be used for conveying the project’s results: the chrodis.eu website, the DG Santé Best Practices Portal, our partners as multipliers and international high-impact conferences

For the time being, we are addressing specific WP leaders and are holding bilateral calls initiating discussions on the overall website layout, its design and, most importantly, quality content reflecting the results of the Joint Action. It is still a work in progress and it takes some time to rebuild the website so that it would suit the taste of all of the WP leaders group but we are positive and believe that we will be able to share with you our new and content oriented website soon. Our vision is to take the Joint Action’s results, visibility and sustainability to a different level. 

Andrew Barnfield moving on: “It was just a fantastic opportunity to develop so many skills and lead such a diverse work package with so many different aspects”

Andrew Barnfield, a key expert of WP5, has left the project. But before saying a final farewell, we spoke to Andrew about his time at CHRODIS PLUS, his tips for staying healthy and future plans.

What was your greatest achievement during your time at CHRODIS PLUS?

To single out a greatest achievement during my time with CHRODIS PLUS is very difficult! I learnt so much from colleagues in the project. In particular, Antonio Sarria-Santamera, Iñaki Imaz, Anne Lounamaa and Nella Savolainen. Working with so many committed and passionate people was a real joy. I would say that within the project it was a great achievement to see the work being conducted with young people in Malta. Dr Dan Cauchi and his colleagues are a real inspiration. Their efforts to improve the health and wellbeing of future generations of Maltese and all Europeans shows the quality of the work within CHRODIS PLUS. The paper that Anne, Nella, and I published as part of our work on health promotion was also a good achievement as we appear in a special edition along with colleagues from all the different parts of CHRODIS PLUS. (Health Promotion Interventions: Lessons from the Transfer of Good Practices in CHRODIS PLUS: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/4/1281)

How has CHRODIS PLUS added to your career path and what are your next steps? 

It was just a fantastic opportunity to develop so many skills and lead such a diverse work package with so many different aspects. I not only learnt about health promotion as it is across Europe, how implementation can happen, and the success factors of inter-sectoral collaboration, but I also developed my skills and knowledge of how big, complex projects are organised. I think that this will be a huge asset to draw on throughout my career. My next steps are heading back to England to the School for Policy Studies at Bristol University. My work will include a project that seeks to tackle the upstream causes of unhealthy urban development.

What are your personal tips for leading a healthy life?

Everything in moderation – except for laughter which must always be unlimited!

With the Coronavirus having become a real pandemic, what are some of the measures employers could take to ensure workers’ safety if something like this happens again?

I actually think that the answer lies with having an effective government. We need resilient well-funded public services that can respond to all sorts of new challenges. All workers should have their health, employment, homes, and families protected by the government.

Thanks Andrew for your contribution to our project, we will miss you and good luck with all your future endeavours!

Should a doctor trust your life with Artificial Intelligence?

We’re seeing more and more discussion about artificial intelligence-based medical decision support than ever before. As AI technology gets more advanced, doctors increasingly rely on it to help ensure their patients’ health. We take a look at just how far this reliance can and should go.

17 policy dialogues have been organised under the CHRODIS PLUS project. This article presents one of the key discussion items of the policy dialogue in Hungary. 

Nowadays, there is more discussion on artificial intelligence-based medical decision support than ever before. As AI technology gets more advanced, doctors increasingly rely on it to help ensure their patients’ health. But just how far should this reliance go?

In the case of decision support, there are two groups that can be identified. The first group consists of unqualified services that are not registered as a product. In this case, it is the responsibility of the physician to take into account the recommendations of the application, similar to when a doctor would collect information from the Internet, publications, or other sources to treat a disease. 

Certified decision support services comprise the second group. Here, liability issues arise in regards to how much of a physician’s individual responsibility is taken over by the application. On the one hand, if AI is used as a substitute for medical work, full responsibility is transferred to the service provider. On the other hand, AI provides a good opportunity for objective medical decision-making. The primary function of a doctor is diagnosing a medical condition. Today, almost all diagnosis is done through machines. Still, in most cases, it’s the doctor who decides how to diagnose and there is always room for error and delay, yet with AI there is no possibility of negligence. AI machines under development today have the potential to accurately diagnose patients and even recommend a treatment! 

It might therefore be an interesting experiment to have a doctor ask for the opinion of AI on a certain question and in case of error, the doctor/provider could then be exempted from liability for the diseases for which the AI is certified. It is a bold statement to say that AI will completely replace doctors, but it is highly likely that their scope of activities and purpose of work will be redefined.

Application of the JA-CHRODIS Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model to a Case Study of Diabetes and Mental Health

Having our work being published in scientific articles is a great honor. Most recently, our project team from Spain published an article about the Application of the JA-CHRODIS Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model (IMCM) to a Case Study of Diabetes and Mental Health proving that our work is successfully being transferred into action. 

We are always happy when our work is being published in scientific articles. Most recently, our project team from Spain published an article about the Application of the JA-CHRODIS Integrated Multimorbidity Care Model (IMCM) to a Case Study of Diabetes and Mental Health proving that our work is successfully being transferred into action. 

The study aimed to analyse the potential applicability of the IMCM based on a qualitative approach that comprised two phases. In the first phase the design of a case study was based on empirical clinical data, which consisted of a hypothetical woman with multimorbidity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mental health, and associated social problems. 

In the second phase of the study the focus was placed on  the creation of a consensus group to gather the opinions of a multidisciplinary group of experts  considering  the potential applicability of the IMCM to the case study. Experts described how care should be delivered to this hypothetical patient following the model components, and simultaneously  assessing her needs in a comprehensive manner, pointing out crucial health and social resources to improve her care process. Experts also highlighted patient-centred, integrated and tailored care as one of the keystones of quality healthcare.

The full article is available on the link below:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6950036/pdf/ijerph-16-05151.pdf

THANKS FOR READING THIS NEWSLETTER!

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Some of you might have noticed that we have revived our social media. Both Facebook and Twitter are being used on a regular basis to provide you with the latest info on Joint Action events as well as work that is being done or is being finalised. If you are not following us yet, you can do so instantly – find us on FB as EU_Chrodis and on Twitter as @EU_CHRODISplus!

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